Mike Lindell: Secretly an idiot.

He has the haunted look of an idiot who secretly knows he’s an idiot pretending not to be an idiot.

Protiguous, 2021. Talking about Mike Lindell’s claims that the 2020 election was stolen from Donald Trump.
EXCLUSIVE: Cyber expert says his team can’t prove Mike Lindell’s claims that China hacked election

List collation on all columns in all tables in database on SQL Server

select
    concat( quotename( [s].[name] ), N'.', quotename( [t].[name] ), N'.', quotename( [c].[name] ) ) [Column Name]
   ,[c].[collation_name] [Collation]
from [sys].[schemas] [s]
join [sys].[tables] [t] on [t].[schema_id] = [s].[schema_id]
join [sys].[columns] [c] on [c].[object_id] = [t].[object_id]
where [c].[collation_name] is not null
order by [Column Name];

Example:

Some useful C# Swap methods

public static class SwapExt
{
	[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)]
	public static void Swap<T>(ref T? left, ref T? right) => (left, right) = (right, left);

	[Pure]
	[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)]
	public static (T? right, T? left) Swap<T>(this T? left, T? right) => (right, left);

	[Pure]
	[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)]
	public static (T? right, T? left) Swap<T>((T? left, T? right) tuple) => (tuple.right, tuple.left);
}

Pay close attention to which method you think is being used. (The refs versus the tuples.)

C# null coalescing operator, ??

C# has a nice ?? operator that can be chained.
In a statement, it will return the first non-null value or null if none are found to not be null.

For example, if you had the code:

string? value1 = null;
string? value2 = nameof(value2);
string? result = value1 != null ? value1 : value2;

The last line could be simplified down to:

string result = value1 ?? value2;

As far as I know, there is no limit on how many ?? can be chained!